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records that have come forth with the kgb agent in most of of the fbi files. with a bevy of other suspects in the government÷ particular lead during the of war. all this over and over again confirms which chambers would say and goes beyond what chambers had to say.Ñ he did not know what's the fbi knew. the second to major point* is the chamber's assertion the real issue is not a. [inaudible] source buying with the cloak and dagger images but policy influence with these people÷ñ were doing with greater success was to atilt american policy in favor ofñ the soviet interest he made that point* strongly and dad was confirmed with my recent studies. with the run up to pearl harbor with the approval of slave labor to moscow where hiss was a major factor. those are e3 slave labor to moscow where hiss was a major factor. those are examples with perot soviet operatives tilted policy within the communist interest. and confirmed over everything i have seen since that contributed to a morose temper and pessimistic with good reason. he is cassandra and not from the 40's but 1939 nothing was d
status and resettled in the united states were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al-qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated in against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee who was charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged security screenings have been expanded to more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who have already been settled in the united states. and according to press reports this february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al-qaeda is much broader than previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated last year during congressional testimony before the house intelligence committee that he continues to be concerned with, quote, individuals who have been resettled here in the united states that have some associa
in alaska last year the fbi gave covenant house its community partner reward for the work that we're doing to identify victims of sex trafficking and to work on the prosecution of those a traffic kids. in pennsylvania several weeks covenant house in philadelphia lead a coalition that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helps victims of sex trafficking. and that would be true throughout the united states and, of course, and latin america where covenant house works and mexico, it bottle, guatemala and in honduras we work directly. including broken up -- coprosecutor cartels were trafficking kids as essex, seven, eight, nine, ten years old and are programs. the work that we do to help victims recover depends on where that victim is in terms of their exploitation and suffering, but it almost always involves psychiatric counseling, helping and people begin to deal with rape and exploitation and then help them build up plan for that is not very different than the work that we were doing, you know, 30 years ago. because of trafficking now, but it's been going on for a long ti
and the fbi found this local businessman who had agreed to go undercover in a city hall he wore a wire and have a hidden camera and handled the briefcase and he taped various aides including his top aide taking the bribes of the city offers the contracts and favors and this became known as a federal fbi case called operation founder bellmon run by an agent named dennis aiken who was originally from mississippi and he had this investigation that resulted in the conviction. >> the city will never get people to convict him. he had 67% of the voters thinking that he had done a good job even though they got he was guilty and when but he was sentenced in jail, they talked about how she was to people, dr. jekyll and mr. hyde. what he was convicted of is racketeering conspiracy but not actually being physically involved in any of the underlining acts. and he kind of frame it. he became a boss that was able to stay directly out of the line but he knew everything that was going on. she was the kind of guy that said how many rolls of toilet paper there were in the city hall. but he really didn't.
there and the snow was clearing, and they just build a fence around that i have pictures of the fbi. they tried to figure, we want to take this cabin because we think our bombs and. so they decided to build, they're going to fly at the. somebody said anybody ever see the "wizard of oz"? solid build a road and so it was months building roads. this is up on a mountain, you know. i got to know the neighbors. so i got in behind the fbi lines, and i cannot to stay with the neighbors and to take me up on snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles. and i found in the woods, in the fire there's a big piece of wood and it has all these mathematical symbols that the unabomber had been. and his root cellar where he tried to get his brother to go in and locking them. but the neighbors loved jasinski. they just loved this guy. and i thought my god, i would like to write the story, forget the unabomber, just this guy interacting with people. all black installing bad and he would ride to the town and all the docs were chastened and he would get glorified. he would get everybody vegetable to do what i did is i went
at banning people to his will. c-span: here's the tape your bobby kennedy is on the tape. >> can we have fbi people they are and keep eyes and ears open and proceed to him and follow him? >> it's difficult for the preceding and following. i suppose we can. i have no dealings with the fbi anymore, but i think -- >> did he teach you to report the other day? >> i understand he cental reports to you about me and about the department of justice. >> not any that i've seen. what are you talking about? >> the planning and plotting things. >> no, no, he hasn't sent me a report that i remember. i just told him the other day at the have the full report can be sure to send me a copy of it. then i called them back later and said send an extra copy for me here and he said yes. that's the only conversation we had. but he hasn't sent me the report on you or the department anytime. and i get a letter every three or four days that summarized the recent order taken on yugoslavia in routine things people are talking. as far as i know they haven't involved here. >> well, i had understood that he had a report abo
if something like what the fbi did and had a director position that was appointed for fixed 10 year terms would be above the political fray. also critically important for jurisdictions to have access to crime gun information. you want to publish as they did before national crime gun tracing report with city level analyses of crime. it was very important have academic involvement in those, the production of those reports, some of the special analyses. and i can't say that enough. the magic between having actual investigators with detailed knowledge about criminal enterprises operate collaborating with academics, but the ability to bring an outside eye, analytic tools, and an unbiased perspective of what's going on, the knowledge that is greater. so clearly we establishing that and also some of the reforms, tiahrt amendment, allowing cdc and in that age to fund a gun research and maybe expanding funding for research would be important as well. so if we're able to, some of these, it would be great to do all these policy recommendations, i think a lot of the obstacles necessary for effective invest
as well. from dod, fbi, as was dhs. >> even though the fingerprints were found to been on a roadside bomb? >> that we have learned in the aftermath. i would have to defer to dod and the fbi for any specific information on that. but again, all the biographic as well as the biometric checks that were performed at the time did come back clean. but since that time as you have noted we've actually enhanced the program and the security checks, and we now draw upon a greater wealth of intelligence and data holdings on individuals seeking application to the refugee program which greatly enhances our ability to identify derogatory is, compared to earlier. >> does anyone else want to comment on that? so other than the recent iraqi refugee case, have there been many open-source cases of foreigners admitted through the refugee our immigration programs who have been associated with terrorism? and is there any evidence that terrorist groups are successfully exploiting this new u.s. refugees commission broke or or any other refugee program for the specific purpose of gaining entry into the u.s. in commi
reasons. called curveball we never directly interviewed. we had clues in the fbi, that the fbi didn't do so for the, is better. those of us in congress on the intelligence committees looked at how to fix this, we came up with a model that in my view fix the pentagon. the pentagon new search services. the army, navy and the other services basically staffing inside doors, not technically true, but they would equip themselves differently. command structures were separated. so we decided to do with the military did under so-called goldwater-nichols, were each right command was created. he can come from many military service over the foreign military services and i now train and equip and fight wars together. so the dni, director of national intelligence is situate commander across 16 intel agencies and they now fight in equip together and he leverages their strengths to produce intel products and our national intelligence estimate, nies, but that both of how weak it intelligence to policymakers are enormously improved since we did this organizational change and i support it. on the fusion ce
. as a matter of fact, during 2010 there were more than 76,000 cases referred by the fbi to the justice department. do you know how many were prosecuted out of 76,000 in 2010, the last year we have data for? 44. not 44,000, 44 out of 76,000. this is a joke, and it's a sad joke, and it's a lethal joke. these are felony cases involving criminals trying the to buy guns -- trying to buy guns, and yet our federal government is prosecuting less than one-tenth of 1% of them. it is shameful, and it has to end, and the president can do it by just picking up the phone and saying to his justice department this is your job, go do it or i'll get somebody that will. the third, president can make a recess appointment to head the federal bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. the atf, as it's called, habit had a director -- hasn't had a director for six years. can you imagine how much outrage there'd be if we'd been without a homeland security secretary for six years? this is as much a public safety threat as it would be if there weren't a secretary for homeland security. and if congress keeps blocki
at sigtarp. our role is to provide oversight decreed in a premier enforcement agency, and many fbi to police the program and catch criminals who steal from it. the second purpose the oversight mechanism or redo reports to congress every quarter and special reports and specialized to do a specific t.a.r.p. program. c-span: what educator authority? gusto from congress, the legislation. it provided all the authorities of any inspector general, which are similar oversight agencies attached to the departments and agencies of the federal government. c-span: you say you weren't terribly impressed by the inspector general in town. how many are there? >> guest: i think 6465. when i first came out to washington, i didn't know what in igd. my experience with this prosecutor we seldom would run into on force and arms that agents and for a while lives in mortgage mortgage fraud cases. i was dealing with the inspector general from hud, which were very good nonperson nations. i didn't have a picture of an eye she was doing and when i got the job, one of the first things they did was meet the different ig's
of -- group of federal and state7 officials with the fbi, homeland security and secret service and agents who fight tears and. they have pretty well figured out a qaeda domestically in terms of violence and it's pretty unlikely with the exception of small bombing that anything large would have been. but to say they don't have a handle on the infiltration going on by al qaeda through domestic intelligence agencies and the defense department so on. what they tell me as al qaeda has pretty well figured out, and the other islamist terrorist, they can't be the west by blowing us up but they will have two use use the taxes that the soviets use against us in 1930s and 40s. in fact as you go on the msha and i would challenge you that, google with the left said about challenges to the infiltration of islamic terrorism into america. what what you find his is ridiculed. you will recall when several members of congress raised the issue of hillary clinton's top aides mullah of the dean having islamic connections and that in fact told me that you cannot even get the question of infiltration by islamic7 te
for transfer, yet the cia and the department of justice and the fbi and the department of defense have left that and concluded that we're not going to prosecutor them, we don't have evidence they committed an offense and we don't believe they present a significant risk, and we don't want to keep them. but they have been sitting here year after year are after year at guantanamo because of their citizenship, primarily yemeni, because we don't trust the yemeni government to be responsibility with the detainees, which is interesting because the had the cop sent of theem meni government to fly the drones. so it seems we're a bit hypocritical in our view of the yemen. and i think guantanamo remains a stain on our reputation. recently congress passed a bill that prohibits granting visas to members of the russian government accused of human rights violations, and president obama signed it. in retaliation the russian government passed a bill that prevents americans from adopting russian children. and president president putin be signing it, had a news conference and was quite angry about the bill ou
it was available, a price tag that $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the fbi, dea, secret service, and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal. in 1986 when this all began, we comprise less than 25% of all of the spending of all of the other law-enforcement agencies. if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that shows what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. it is by far the largest share of spending. among other things, it is me doubling of the border patrol in his just the last eight years from 10,819 words since today the 21,370. even though it's growth is enormous, the gross growth of i.c.e. is also substantial. it has been 21% since 2005. it is about 5.9 billion today. those are the big framing points that help paint the picture of what it is we are doing in this report. let me now go to the couple of pillars that i will go to to try and frame this for you. this has been built. therefore, what is in place allows for the targets based on information in rapid response. and it is not subjective
be great if we have fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of pot smokers. i will. i will tell people more but the federal government than 50 papers from the cato institute. [laughter] >> one minus point and then i will end. this is a force of the anti-commandeering rule mentioned that the a button that is the affordable care act. it seems far removed, but it really isn't. if you look at the affordable care act, the preoccupation of months conservatives and was how far does tax power co., commerce pirate though. but the mandate that was issued in that case is not the engine that drives the affordable care act. it is the state exchanges, but will be i hope the way it works, initially the administration and congress wanted to commandeer states to establish exchanges. then i realized that, we can't do that because there's the anti-commandeering will and will be unconstitutional. instead what it contains is the preemption were shamed, which says the states have a choice. either establish an exchange under our order and in accordance with desires, or a pseudo-stroll into your state
and criminal investigators, more than any other ig, more than any other fbi but it's not just her size in our mandate or unique authorities that is important. it's how we and how i view our mission and how are agency views our mission. when i joined sigar, i made it clear on the first day i got there that you should view this as a mission calm, not as a job. if you view this as a job, if you view it as a place to retire and play, you should leave because i only want people and it's a term i use, with fire in the valley because belly because we have a limited amount of time to do good in reconstruction in afghanistan. i abuse that fire in the belly speech so much that my chief of staff has coined a new term called 50 fire in the belly. aphis be memos and you know something, it worked. i am proud of my 200 agent auditors and investigators because they all have that ire in the belly. they could work elsewhere elsewhere. they are working in conditions as bad as our military is in afghanistan but many of them are housed in the same facility. there are men and women, but they take that mission beca
the fiscal and political price. so i think in a weird way it would actually be great if we had fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely-ill pot smokers. that'll tell people more about the federal government than 15 papers from the cato institute. [laughter] one last point about this and then i'll end. you see the force of the anti-commandeering rule in something that jonathan mentioned at the outset, and that is the affordable care act. this seems far removed, but it really isn't. if you look at the affordable care act, there's, by the way, same preoccupation among conservatives and libertarians with thebredth of the federal government's power. how far does the commerce power go. but the man tate that was at issue -- mandate that was at issue in that case, in the nfib case, that's not the engine that drives the affordable care act. the engine that drives that act is the exchanges, the state exchanges, which weren't even at issue in that case but will be, i i hope. here's the way this works. initially, the administration and congress wanted to congressman dealer states
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

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